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The ECHO Program

The scientific goal of ECHO, a research program launched by the National Institutes of Health, is to understand the effects of a broad range of early environmental influences on child health and development. ECHO uses information from existing longitudinal research projects (cohorts) that will include more than 50,000 children from diverse backgrounds across the United States. Together, these cohorts follow participants from before they are born through childhood and adolescence. ECHO also supports a 17-state clinical trials network to test prevention and treatment strategies among children from rural and medically underserved backgrounds.

Mission

To enhance the health of children for generations to come.

Program Objectives

  • Improve the health of children and adolescents by conducting observational and interventional research that will inform high-impact programs, policies, and practices.
  • Institute best practices for conducting Team Science in the 21st century, giving researchers the tools to work collaboratively to improve child health.

ECHO studies share standardized core data elements.

The core elements to be addressed across all studies include:

  • Demographics
  • Typical early health and development
  • Genetic influences on early childhood health and development
  • Environmental factors
  • Patient (parent/child) Reported Outcomes (PROs)

ECHO's Five Health Outcomes

The studies focus on five key pediatric outcomes that have a high public health impact:

  • Pre-, peri-, and postnatal
  • Upper and lower airway
  • Obesity
  • Neurodevelopment
  • Positive Health

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